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June 27, 2011

Judge Awards $80,000 in Wages Lawsuit

Suit Targets F1 Race Funding in Austin

DJ Awarded $1.2 Million in Copyright Lawsuit

Boy Pets Stingrays, Contracts Infection, Lawsuit States

Suit Against St. Edward's University Claims Negligence in Exchange Student's Death

Rowlett Hospital Faces Suit by Woman for Negligent Care

State Supreme Court Overturns Cemetery Ruling

Insiders Sound an Alarm Amid a Natural Gas Rush

 

 

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Announcements

 

Share with your FB friends: "Hot Coffee" Premiere on HBO

"Hot Coffee" explores how corporate interests manipulated the debate to turn public opinion against corporate accountability. The film premieres on HBO on Monday, June 27th at 8PM CT. Click on the headline to learn more.  

 

Laws/Cases

 

Judge Awards $80,000 in Wages Lawsuit

A Los Angeles judge recently awarded $80,000 to a local man who filed a lawsuit against his former employer at a Handy J Carwash, claiming he was forced to work overtime but was not allowed to record the hours. The man claimed in the suit that with his reduced pay, he was not able to pay his rent or living expenses. The judge ruled the carwash owners were liable for "$50,000 in back wages for failing to provide proper employment records and an additional $30,000 in damages."  Sam Quinones, LA Times  06/23/2011

Read Article: LA Times    

 

Suit Targets F1 Race Funding in Austin

Austin residents have filed a lawsuit against Texas Comptroller Susan Combs in an effort to prevent the state from paying $25 million to local organizers of the Formula One race planned for next June in Austin, Texas. Combs promised payment out of the state's Major Events Trust Fund, but the lawsuit claims the Formula One race does not meet qualifications for fund payments. Despite the promise from Combs, however, the Austin American-Statesman is reporting that race officials have not yet sent in an application to qualify for the fund.  Eric Dexheimer, Austin American Statesman  06/22/2011

Read Article: Austin American Statesman    

 

DJ Awarded $1.2 Million in Copyright Lawsuit

An Ohio disc jockey has been awarded $1.2 million by a New York jury in a lawsuit he filed against a former collaborate who illegally allowed the band The Black-Eyed Peas to sample one of the DJ's songs. The defendant registered the plaintiff's song, "I Need a Freak," in 1983 with Broadcast Music, Inc., crediting the plaintiff as the songwriter. However, in the last decade, the plaintiff claimed in his suit that the song was sampled by other artists without his permission. The jury awarded the plaintiff more than $800,000 in profits and more than $350,000 in copyright infringement damages.  Eriq Gardner, Reuters  06/24/2011

Read Article: Reuters    

 

Boy Pets Stingrays, Contracts Infection, Lawsuit States

A Georgia family has filed a lawsuit against the Tennessee Aquarium seeking $2.4 million after their son allegedly contracted a bacterial infection from petting stingrays in November. The infection is known as "fish-handler's disease," the lawsuit states, and the boy spent 11 days at a hospital in Nashville and endured "excruciating pain throughout his right hand." Aquarium officials said the water was tested five different times that same month and no signs of bacteria were found in the tank.  Todd South, Chattanooga Times Free Press  06/25/2011

Read Article: Chattanooga Times Free Press    

 

Suit Against St. Edward's University Claims Negligence in Exchange Student's Death

Mario Nicolás Bandiera came to St. Edward's University in January as an exchange student from Buenos Aires, Argentina. But Bandiera was found dead in his dorm room on Feb. 21 of what an autopsy later found were complications of a ruptured appendix. St. Edward's faces a lawsuit by Bandiera's parents that claims the school did not do enough to help their son, particularly by informing him that his student health insurance would cover an emergency room visit.  Farzad Mashhood , Austin American Statesman  06/27/2011

Read Article: Austin American Statesman    

 

Rowlett Hospital Faces Suit by Woman for Negligent Care

Because of what she calls negligent care, Mashell Darden says she now receives dialysis three days a week, has had two strokes, brain surgery, blood clots, liver damage, a partial hysterectomy and heart surgery. The mother of four is on a waiting list for a kidney transplant because she says, she contracted a potentially deadly blood infection while waiting overnight at a hospital for doctors to remove a fetus that had died. Nearly three years later, Darden is in the midst of a lawsuit against Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett and several members of its medical staff. The complaint states that in the 16 hours Darden was at the hospital, doctors failed to properly examine her until she had contracted a blood infection called sepsis and it had progressed into septic shock, which is often fatal.  JON NIELSEN , The Dallas Morning News  06/27/2011

Read Article: The Dallas Morning News    

 

State Supreme Court Overturns Cemetery Ruling

The Texas Supreme Court reversed a $3.8M judgment and ordered a new trial in the lawsuit that a San Benito family brought against Mont Meta Memorial Park and its owners after their loved one was disinterred from a family plot and moved to another location without the family’s authorization. The Texas Supreme Court found there was enough evidence to support damages for mental anguish for Juanita Guerra, but not for the three daughters. The court also found that the trial court erred by admitting irrelevant evidence of other lawsuits, verdicts and judgments and that this had probably led to an improper judgment.  EMMA PEREZ-TREVIÑO, The Monitor  06/27/2011

Read Article: The Monitor    

 

Issues

 

Insiders Sound an Alarm Amid a Natural Gas Rush

Natural gas may not be as easy and cheap to extract from shale formations deep underground as the companies are saying, according to hundreds of industry e-mails and internal documents and an analysis of data from thousands of wells. In the e-mails, energy executives, industry lawyers, state geologists and market analysts voice skepticism about lofty forecasts and question whether companies are intentionally, and even illegally, overstating the productivity of their wells and the size of their reserves. There are implications for the environment, too. The technology used to get gas flowing out of the ground — called hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking — can require over a million gallons of water per well, and some of that water must be disposed of because it becomes contaminated by the process. If shale gas wells fade faster than expected, energy companies will have to drill more wells or hydrofrack them more often, resulting in more toxic waste.  IAN URBINA, The New York Times  06/27/2011

Read Article: The New York Times    


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