TTLA EClips

TTLA HomeSearch Litigation BankAbout

March 27, 2012

St. Jude’s Frayed Heart Wires May Have More Risky Defects

Facebook May Sue to Protect User Privacy

Lawyer Gets Temporary Injunction Against Ex-Client's Websites

Facebooking Juror Sets Fair Trial Rights Against Privacy Concerns

Supervising Priest Goes on Trial in Abuse Case

FedEx Settles Discrimination Suit for $3 Million

 

 

This Service Sponsored Exclusively by
The James Street Group

A Member Service of
Texas Trial Lawyers Association

 

Announcements

 

2012 Annual Conference Discover TTLA, June 6-8 at the Hyatt Lost Pines, Bastrop

Join TTLA for our biggest event of the year, complete with 2 days of CLE programs, parties, receptions, committee meetings, Board of Directors meeting and our annual awards luncheon. Nestled in the tranquil Central Texas countryside, this year's Annual Conference also offers family-friendly activities, a golf tournament, tennis tournament and more! Click on the headline to learn more!  

 

TTLA is accepting nominations for the Making a Difference Award.

TTLA, at the discretion of the Executive Committee, presents the Making a Difference Award to recognize and honor those clients whose cases demonstrate the critical role of the civil justice system in protecting the rights of Texas families. Any client (past or present) of a current TTLA member is eligible for this award. Click on the headline to learn more and download the nomination form.  

 

Products

 

St. Jude’s Frayed Heart Wires May Have More Risky Defects

Recalled St. Jude Medical Inc. (STJ) wires, still in use to connect life-saving defibrillators to the hearts of 79,000 patients, had multiple defects that led to melted conductors, electrical abnormalities and shocks, a study found. St. Jude stopped selling its Riata wires in December, 2010, and recalled them last year on reports they could break through their insulation. Surgery to remove the leads may present higher risks than keeping them in, U.S. regulators have said. A study of 105 reports on failed wires found that two- thirds had multiple defects, often up and down their length. The wires can produce noise, like static on a television set, which may result in unnecessary shocks or reduce the energy needed to stimulate the heart, according to the study reported today at the American College of Cardiology meeting in Chicago.  Michelle Fay Cortez, Bloomberg  03/27/2012

Read Article: Bloomberg    

 

Laws/Cases

 

Facebook May Sue to Protect User Privacy

Facebook executives have announced they may file suit against any employer who demands a potential employee hand over the password to their Facebook account during an interview. The executives say doing so would violate Facebook's user agreement, and could open up the job applicant to discrimination based on their profile information. Legislation prohibiting employers from requesting social media passwords has been proposed in Maryland, Illinois and New Jersey.  Andrew Chow, Reuters  03/27/2012

Read Article: Reuters    

 

Lawyer Gets Temporary Injunction Against Ex-Client's Websites

In the Feb. 21 Original Petition and Application for Temporary Restraining Order and Temporary Injunction in Michael Victor Baumer v. Scott Alexander Morris , Baumer claims Morris gave him a watch as payment for representation in a 2008 bankruptcy. But Morris alleges in his March 5 pro se Defendant's Cross Counterclaim that he gave Baumer the Rolex as "security for payment" for the bankruptcy representation.  Angela Morris, Law.com  03/27/2012

Read Article: Law.com    

 

Facebooking Juror Sets Fair Trial Rights Against Privacy Concerns

A three-justice panel on Friday appeared split over whether a former jury foreman should be forced to hand over months of Facebook postings he made during a 2010 felony trial in Sacramento. In a case with the potential to set the boundaries between social media privacy and fair-trial rights, five defendants convicted in a gang-related beating want to see what the foreman, known only as Juror No. 1, told his Facebook friends about the trial.  Angela Morris, Law.com  03/27/2012

Read Article: Law.com    

 

Supervising Priest Goes on Trial in Abuse Case

The landmark trial of a senior official of the Philadelphia Archdiocese who is accused of shielding priests who sexually abused children and reassigning them to unwary parishes began on Monday with prosecutors charging that the official “paid lip service to child protection and protected the church at all costs.” The defendant, Msgr. William J. Lynn, 61, is the first Roman Catholic supervisor in the country to be tried on felony charges of endangering children and conspiracy — not on allegations that he molested children himself, but that he protected suspect priests and reassigned them to jobs where they continued to rape, grope or otherwise abuse boys and girls.  ERIK ECKHOLM and JON HURDLE, The New York Times  03/27/2012

Read Article: The New York Times    

 

Labor/Employment

 

FedEx Settles Discrimination Suit for $3 Million

FedEx has agreed to pay $3 million to settle a lawsuit over allegations of discrimination against job seekers at FedEx Ground delivery facilities. The suit claimed that evidence showed the company discriminated on the bases of "sex, race and national origin" in its hiring process against more than 21,000 applicants. As part of the settlement, FedEx will extend job offers to 1,700 applicants previously rejected.  Steven Greenhouse, The New York Times  03/21/2012

Read Article: The New York Times    


Published by TRIALSMITH, Litigation Tools for Trial Lawyers
5113 Southwest Parkway, Suite 285, Austin, TX 78735
You received this email because you are subscribed to this service from your trial lawyers association.
• Unsubscribe  • Search National Litigation Bank  • 800-443-1757